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Teen charged when car hits officer, leaves scene - The Galveston County Daily News : Local News

November 1, 2014

Teen charged when car hits officer, leaves scene

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31 comments:

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  • Alvinbr62 posted at 10:11 am on Sat, Feb 8, 2014.

    Alvinbr62 Posts: 311

    He may not have see the police officer . You don't know all the details . May not have been intentional .
    Let a jury decide.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 5:30 pm on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    Well, I can see this goofball getting a year or two jail time (if he has a record). If not, I get the feeling he will only get some probation. We'll have to wait and see.

    Either way, he should have license revoked for at least 5 years, regardless of whether his probation or prison time is 2 years, 3, 4, or 5.

     
  • Bigjim posted at 3:55 pm on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    "FELONIES
    State Jail Felony is punishable by confinement in a state jail facility (a type of prison!) for not less than 180 days and not more than 2 years. In addition to prison time you can also get a fine of up to $10,000. You can also receive probation for a period of 2-5 years.
    Third Degree Felony is punishable by confinement in prison for not less than 2 years and not more than 10 years. In addition to prison time you can also get a fine of up to $10,000. You can also receive probation for a period of 2-10 years.
    Second Degree Felony is punishable by confinement in prison for not less than 2 years and not more than 20 years. In addition to prison time you can also get a fine of up to $10,000. You can also receive probation for a period of 2-10 years.
    First Degree Felony is punishable by confinement in prison for life or not less than 5 years nor more than 99 years. In addition to prison time you can also get a fine of up to $10,000. In some cases, but not all, you can receive probation for a First Degree Felony.
    Capital Felony is punishable by the death penalty (execution) or life in prison without parole".
    I think if he is charged it will be for Second Degree Felony. If so then he will probably get probation for a period of 2-10 years unless he has things in past.

     
  • kevjlang posted at 1:08 pm on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    kevjlang Posts: 3017

    I don't think 2-3 months probation is anywhere near enough. Drunks get a longer probationary term than that--including the drunks that haven't come close to crashing into anyone. 2-3 months is not much worse that pricking his finger. I'd suggest at least one year of supervision.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 11:59 am on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    Well said, Rockstrongo.
    A rare instance where I am in agreement. I also considered while reading this about whether it was my niece/nephew, son/daughter, spouse. An upstanding young citizen simply does not become"scared" that the po-po is on its way, get in a car, and start recklessly driving.

    I'm all for second chances, but any individual (unless he/she has proven and documented severe mental incapacities) ought to know that fear, being in a hurry, and getting in a car is a dumb thing to do and worth punishment. I would say a reasonable jury would bill him 2 to 3 months probation, a couple of hundred hours community service, with an ankle bracelet attached at least for a year.

     
  • kevjlang posted at 9:52 am on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    kevjlang Posts: 3017

    I'd bet that most 8-year-olds know it's wrong to try to run over someone with a car.

    Unless he's got some legal skeletons in his closet, he probably won't have to spend much, if any, time behind bars. However, I'd fully expect him to get probation, community services time, fines, and perhaps the requirement to put some money into some kind of restitution fund. The legal system definitely needs to make him aware of what he really could be getting in terms of penalties, and then the penalties he does get should be set up so that he's going to be reminded of how bad his actions were and could have been, the penalties that are justified by it, and that the penalties he does get are uncomfortable enough for him to not think he can get away with it the next time.

     
  • Rockstrongo posted at 7:45 am on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    Rockstrongo Posts: 145

    Maturity and knowing right from wrong are 2 different things. One does not have to be a 25 years old with a fully developed brain to understand that you do not run over cops!!!!!!! How different would you feel if instead of a cop, that kid ran over your kid or niece or nephew?
    I would also bet that this is not his first rodeo.

     
  • Rockstrongo posted at 7:20 am on Fri, Feb 7, 2014.

    Rockstrongo Posts: 145

    Sverige1, this must be a sign of the apocalypse, I agree with you!!!! [beam]

     
  • Jake Buckner posted at 3:43 pm on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1687

    Lars, I understand that by law, he's an adult. But there's a large and growing body of research that shows that the brain of a person 19 is not close to being mature, even though society considers him an adult. A young adults brain simply doesn't work the same as an older adult's. According to the research, the human brain doesn't mature until 24-25 years of age.

    So for that reason I feel the judicial system needs to have a sliding scale of leniency, and in fact, that's what tends to happen.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 2:49 pm on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    Response to Jake Buckner posted at 9:01 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014:

    Well, Jake. This is how I interpret the fashion of punishment possible for this individual. Throw the book at him? Yes. For how long? It depends. As you mention, if this is his first offense and there exists a question as to whether the officer "threw himself" quickly in front of the car, then a bit of latitude is in order. Perhaps a month or two in a lower-security prison environment, or perhaps probation with an ankle brace.

    If the 19 year-young person has prior records of harming family, friends, or acquaintences and if there's witnesses that say he obviously intended to run over the officer, then perhaps 10 to 20 years. I still don't buy the defense that his "young" years necessitates going light on his punishment. An adult is an adult. Plenty old enough.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 1:36 pm on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    Well, DRS547 -
    I would think the much lesser of the problem is my grammar and "misuse" of quotations. The bigger problem is our society's apparent acceptance that just because an individual is a "young" 19 years of age, that they are supposed to receive leniency toward the blatent and reckless crimes they do.

    I think the majority of readers in this case would agree with me, but unfortanately disagree with you. I still get the feeling that even if you don't personally know the person in this particular story, you appear to be on the extreme defense of young adults who have done similar things like this. Maybe within a few years you will reconsider and realize that a crime is a crime, no matter what age the adult commits it. To run over anybody is a terrible crime. I would think that even a 9 year old would know it's wrong to try to run over another human being.

     
  • DRS47 posted at 12:08 pm on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    nothing like a comparison of development of a 19 yr olds 25,000 years apart.. yeah, that works

     
  • DRS47 posted at 12:03 pm on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    I know my writting skills arent great but when youre a typing long winded smart-elleck, you really should do it above a 5th grade grammer level

     
  • DRS47 posted at 11:59 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    obviously, when I was where I was.. they had better teachers than wherever you were

     
  • DRS47 posted at 11:58 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    and "learn" when to use "quotations" properly.. you use them when you are "quoting" others.. not just to highlight "random" words that you feel are "important"

     
  • DRS47 posted at 11:53 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    ok svergie.. youre a real smart ace. bet youe ex wives loved that about you. I dont know him, I know his type, and I know your type too...

     
  • Bigjim posted at 8:46 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    DRS47
    What part do You think was trump up?

    A big difference in the 17 year old and the 19 year old. The 17 year old was not driving. The driving is what got the 19 year old in trouble.
    When you get you driver license beside the privilege of driving you get the responsibly. My kids did not drive until they understood this. Two of them were 17 and one was 18 before I let them drive by them self’s and they also have had to logged 400 hrs. driving with me.

    The prison system is full of 19year olds, and maybe this will keep him out of prison if he had a clean record before.
    When he goes before the judge and if he has a good attitude he will probability get 5 years probation. If so, I hope that he uses this time to think about the direction of his life. Was the drinking at the party worth it ( is drinking worth it), why was I at a under age drinking party, why did I run from officer, what can I do to change my life.
    If he does not take this time to change his life he will be in fore a life that is not all it can be.

     
  • Bigjim posted at 8:39 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    DRS47
    What part do You think was trump up?

    A big difference in the 17 year old and the 19 year old. The 17 year old was not driving. The driving is what got the 19 year old in trouble.
    When you get a driver license beside the privilege of driving you get the responsibly. My kids did not drive until they understood this. Two of them were 17 and one was 18 before I let them drive by them self’s they also have had to logged 400 hrs. driving with me.

    The prison system is full of 19year olds and maybe this will keep him out of prison if he has a clean record before.
    When he goes before the judge and if he has a good attitude he will probability get 5 years probation. If so, I hope that he uses this time to think about the direction of his life. Was the drinking at the party worth it ( is drinking worth it), why was I at a under age drinking party, what can I do to change my life.
    If he does not take this time to change his life he will be in fore a life that is not all it can be.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 7:22 am on Thu, Feb 6, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    DRS47 - is that a penetentiary prison "ID" number-to-letter combination? Well, something tells me that DRS47 knows the alleged perpetrator, and will go to olympic-type feats to "defend". If so, that does no favors to him. Our society is sick and tired of ne'er-do-wells' irresponsible and dangerous behaviors and lifestyles.

    In prehistoric times, 17-19 was basically "middle aged". Most folks barely lived to age 30. I doubt if back then people went around defending 19 year-olds as being "innocent". Fast forward to modern times, let's consider this, DRS47. Individuals, even when they enter their "tender" teen years, if they misbehave, can be charged with: 1. murder, 2. sex offenses (molestation, rape, indecent exposure, etc), 3. burglary/robber. So, is it difficult to understand that they too can be charged with the irresponsibleness of driving a car into a law enforcement officer? That makes the #4 possibility of being charged with an offense.

    Being 19 is certainly no defense from reckless criminal, dangerous behavior. He is indeed old enough. Even old enough to represent our country in the armed forces. May the arm of the law follow him.

     
  • DRS47 posted at 11:04 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    a 19 yr old is about 1% more mature than a 17 yr old... you make it seem as if the 19 yr old is a hardened criminal and the 17 yr old right next to him doing the same dumb stuff is just an innocent victim... shows you are either a master debater being dramatic to make a point or you just are a black and white person living in a very gray world.. either way, thank you for the civil discussion, but, I think I will be better suited playing chess with pigeons.

     
  • Bigjim posted at 9:24 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    DRS47
    What part do You think was trump up?

    Just because I don’t drink does not mean I have not made mistakes. Nowhere in sverige1 reply do I see were he says he has made no mistakes.
    The one’s I have made I paid the price for what I did.

    At what age would you have the law apply to him? He’s 19 and a adult not a kid!.
    As for no one getting hurt , he was just lucky he did not hit someone beside the police officer which is very bad in it self..
    Also it could turned out a lot different if the office had pulled his weapon because the car was not stopping and endangering the officers life.
    He was also endangering the 17 year old in the car with him.

    As a society we have laws for a reason.

     
  • Jake Buckner posted at 9:01 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1687

    Lars, I have to disagree with you on this one. Or at least I'd have to know a lot more about young Degrate before I'd say he belongs in prison.

    As stupid as it seems to run over a cop, it doesn't seem all that smart to try to stop a moving vehicle by getting in front of it. We don't really know what happened, do we? Did the officer establish his position when the Buick was still a ways off or did he jump in front at the last moment? If he did establish his position, shouldn't he have tried to get out of the way at the last moment? Should this be a charging foul or a blocking foul?

    If the young offender is in the habit of doing stuff like this, and actually has a record of being a screwup or a badass, then okay, jail time is warranted. If he's just a scared teenager that made a bad mistake, then no way.

     
  • DRS47 posted at 5:03 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    well, I am the opposite of you two. ive actually sinned.. had my troubles at the age of 19 and guys like yall woulda called me a lost cause. But,I did A LOT of maturing in my 20s and I turned out just fine if I say so myself.. im not going to keep beating a dead horse.. I hear what y'all are saying and it makes sense, but, I stand by my view point.. he's a kid, nobody got hurt, dont throw the book at him.. thats all...

     
  • Bigjim posted at 12:12 pm on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473


    DRS47
    What part do You think was trump up?

    I don’t drink so that’s a mute point. If my kids make a mistake they will pay the price, as they were taught if you do something wrong you will pay the price. If Parents are not Parents but friends , bad things may happen because of lack of guidance
    .
    I would be surprised if this young man does any time unless he has a past. The biggest mistake he made was putting himself in the spot he finds himself..
    If you think that anyone but him screwed up think again. Leaving the seen of a accident can never be condoned. My be he will think next time before driving a deadly weapon in the state he was.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 11:50 am on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    There are some mistakes that are so henous that the standard "they have their life ahead of them, let's give them a chance" does not apply.

    By the time an individual is 16 or 17, he/she is supposedly old enough to have the mental capacity to responsibily learn and master the parameters involved in being behind the wheel of a motor-operated vehicle.

    From this age of maturity through the remainder of one's life cycle, an indiviudal must be responsible to drive without being impaired. If and when a person is in a festive mood he/she (as a mature individual) must decide if he is in an environment that is safe enough to remain without the authorities making their presence. If, at an unfortunate incidence the law authorities make their presence, then the LAST thing you do as an adult (definitely 19 and up) is to get in your vehicle and flee the scene. The young man endangered an officer. Who's to say that he would have endangered the lives of a family coming back late-night from a picnic day in the country?

    This young man made a terrible mistake. His life probably wasn't so "decent" to begin with. Prisons have work/career activities in-house and college-study programs. Prison is where this individual belongs. Maybe he can author a book in the penetentiary that can reflect on how irresponsible he was this "fateful" night.

     
  • DRS47 posted at 11:12 am on Wed, Feb 5, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    jim...You are the one to cast the first stone? never had a drink and got behind the wheel? JIM if your kids or grandkids ever make a drunken stupid mistake that results in only monetary damages, should they end up in jail for 25 years? ... this KID is going to prison no matter what.. lets give him a few months and a chance at a decent life instead of 20 years and a guarantee that he will never do anything with his life...

     
  • Bigjim posted at 11:45 pm on Tue, Feb 4, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    DRS47
    What part do You think was trump up?

    This young man made the choice to drive and he hit the officer. When a officer is standing in front of a car you are to stop. If he could not see the officer he should not have been driving.
    Don’t try to put this as the officer because the young man had a choice. He made a very poor choice, but when you are behind wheel of car you are responsible for what happens.
    When someone’s choose to drink and drive, a officer should not let him drive. If he would have step aside he would have let him stay behind the wheel.

     
  • DRS47 posted at 10:45 pm on Tue, Feb 4, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    of course not let him go, jim.. just move out of the way before the buick hits ya, get in the cruiser and chase him down with the 8 other police cars and 30 cops within the 2 block radius.......... NAAAHHH....Instead, lets stand in the path of an oncoming buick, jump at the last possible second playing indiana jones, and give a teen a charge that could put him in jail for decades...you dont get "assualted" with a buick and not get injured.

     
  • sverige1 posted at 7:41 am on Tue, Feb 4, 2014.

    sverige1 Posts: 3675

    I would think that if the prosecuting lawyer(s) can prove that this individual indeed saw the officer and intentionally tried to run over the police officer, then it's possible he can be charged with attempted murder.

    Leaving the scene very likely adds to the supposition that the teen driver knew the officer was there. That is, unless the defense can say he was so "scared" that he was acting on impulse at the immediate moment. Sounds like the teen should have stayed home and worked on his science project instead of goofing off at a loud party in suburbia.

     
  • Bigjim posted at 7:22 pm on Sun, Feb 2, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 473

    What part do You think was trump up?
    Hitting a public servant with a car.
    Drinking before getting into car
    Leaving scene of accident.
    Having a minor in his car with alcohol.
    Under age drinking.
    Houston area is one of the worst areas in U.S.A. for drunk driving. The old way of looking the other way is past.
    So what was the police officer
    to do, let him go?

     
  • DRS47 posted at 6:26 pm on Sun, Feb 2, 2014.

    DRS47 Posts: 56

    how do you get hit "head on" with a buick and not get hurt.. its a kid running away from a house party.. lets ruin his life with a trumped up charge