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City to dedicate park focused on water conservation - The Galveston County Daily News : Local News

December 20, 2014

City to dedicate park focused on water conservation

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9 comments:

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  • Bigjim posted at 10:01 am on Mon, Mar 24, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 514

    DottyOA, is cost beyond your comprehension? Desal plants in both Australia and California have recently been mothballed because of ongoing high cost
    The story is not just about increasing the amount of water, but also the quality.. To get people to use water in a better way, not just using a part in a way that conserves water.

    "There is a swale that runs through the park that slows runoff water and allows for it to sink in and be filtered before the water makes it into the storm drain system, York said.
    “Anything that we can get out of the water before it gets to Clear Creek will help improve the water quality,” .”

     
  • kevjlang posted at 3:26 pm on Sun, Mar 23, 2014.

    kevjlang Posts: 3185

    DottyOA, since you have it all figured out, how about if we give you complete control for 1 year so you can demonstrate it for us? I suppose the city has frontage along Clear Creek it could use to put in that desalinization plant you want. I'm 100% confident that you can find the money to build the plant, get it online within a 6 months, and have it feeding our lawn irrigation and tap water requirements by the end of the year, with no cost increases for the water users. Since you've told us that we need to believe you, I believe you. I'm sure your details are sound, because even though we don't know the details, you assured us that you understand.

    When will you start? I want to be enlightened. I don't know about mallios and chuckd, but I'm sure that they, too, will believe once you start showing them the right way.

     
  • Bigjim posted at 1:26 pm on Sun, Mar 23, 2014.

    Bigjim Posts: 514

    DottyOA
    You said “God created us with a unique way of figuring out the improbable...our brain. Use it for something that contributes and not for something that feels good for the times” We must explore all ways to save water for our use if we are to use are brains, and not limit are selves to looking at one solutions .
    Desal plants in both Australia and California have recently been mothballed because of ongoing high cost
    The “2060 Texas Water Plan includes desalination as a water management strategy, with Region H (are Region) anticipating 2.2% of its water supply to be desalinated by then“. were is the rest coming from? It would be nice to say all we have to do is desalt water, but are you ready to pay BIG bucks. Look at what increase in the cost of water will be (below) if we go to desal plants.
    If we don’t look at ways to reduce water needes ,we will have a lack of water costing us so much, that we will have self rations. Are You ready to use permaculture techniques .
    The initial cost of construction of a desal plant can be up to a billion dollars. A power source is needed on or near the site, which could add to construction costs. Ongoing operation of both the desal plant and electrical plant add costs, too.
    “So, whereas water from a reservoir can cost $125 an acre-foot, the cost of water from a desal plant can cost up to $2000 an acre-foot, according to the Texas Water Development Board Desalinating Galveston Bay would be prohibitively expensive because it has a high sediment content as well as high salinity, and the other content varies, all of which would require extra filtering.”
    “Our local officials are looking at options to control the costs, such as ways to treat the brine and sell the chemicals; building smaller, modular desal plants to address local needs rather than big projects; using renewable energy like wind or solar power to generate electricity; and selling some of that power to offset costs“.
    "All people could be involved in solving this problem if they want to be," he said. "And they should be. We can all do things to help reduce the use of water."
    "I don't view this as a drinking water problem," he said. "We have enough water to drink. We really have a lawn irrigation problem. A St. Augustine-type lawn really consumes a lot of water that we could use for other purposes."
    Clark (County Commissioner Galveston County, Precinct 3)
    said home owner associations and municipalities should change restrictions and allow for permaculture techniques.
    He also encourages homeowners to install low-flush toilets, pool covers and rainwater collection systems.”

     
  • DottyOA posted at 12:44 am on Sun, Mar 23, 2014.

    DottyOA Posts: 208

    Some people will never get it. It just won't happen. God bless them but it is beyond their comprehension.

     
  • chuckd posted at 6:28 pm on Sat, Mar 22, 2014.

    chuckd Posts: 96

    "Funding for the 3.75-acre park came from a grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the city’s park fund."

    Too many people don't get the "pots of money" idea. The money for this park was only going to be used for a public park. That's the law. It was dedicated use money, not general fund money. Now you might argue for another kind of park (and be specific), but that's it.

    --Chuck

     
  • mallios posted at 3:34 pm on Sat, Mar 22, 2014.

    mallios Posts: 49

    And then God shows me that some people do "get it"
    [smile]

     
  • kevjlang posted at 11:35 am on Sat, Mar 22, 2014.

    kevjlang Posts: 3185

    Desalination is not cheap. It's nowhere near as cheap as freshwater, and far further from the cost of conservation. In my mind, if an investment of a few bucks of tax money manages to enlighten us to save hundreds or thousands of dollars, that's money that we get to keep.

    As a self-professed tight-wad, I still recognize that you sometimes still need to spend a little up front to save a lot later. Also, we don't need to pave over or build on every square foot of land in our urban areas.

     
  • mallios posted at 9:18 am on Sat, Mar 22, 2014.

    mallios Posts: 49

    I guess some people just do not "get it" ...........SMH

     
  • DottyOA posted at 12:18 am on Sat, Mar 22, 2014.

    DottyOA Posts: 208

    This kind of silliness is getting out of hand. Tax dollars for this? The bay is less than 2 miles, if that far, from League City. Howzabout using tax dollars for figuring out how to harvest that water? There is a whole lot more of that than our seasonal rainwater. God created us with a unique way of figuring out the improbable...our brain. Use it for something that contributes and not for something that feels good for the times. Oh, I forget, for you atheists out there, we were born with a brain after evolving from an amoeba so we should use that brain we have from our evolution. Now, all of us, please quit wasting away our tax dollars on silly, feely good cisterns.