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Reading the tea leaves on flood insurance - The Galveston County Daily News : News

September 19, 2014

Reading the tea leaves on flood insurance

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Welcome to the discussion.

3 comments:

  • Jake Buckner posted at 10:04 pm on Tue, Feb 4, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1573

    Well said. Old John shared lots of good thoughts!

    As for the reasons behind insurance subsidies for coastal residents, the best one I can think of is that certain industries important to the economy tend to be coastal: petrochemicals, maritime shipping, commercial fishing, tourism... These and their trickle-downs -- local banking, retail, medicine, construction, etc -- require people to live near the coast in order for the industries and businesses to be economical. Workers on the entire Texas coast as well as the rest of the Gulf coast, the Eastern Seaboard, certain parts of the West coast, and the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers are all in the same boat, so to speak.

    I'm just riding their coattails in retirement, contributing nothing but tax dollars.

    [cool]

     
  • Jake Buckner posted at 2:37 pm on Tue, Feb 4, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1573

    Sue, the government in general is operating at a deficit. I don't see the situation as individuals owing the government money, but rather that the government in general is trying to save money by cutting programs, and individuals are affected by the cuts.

    If you're asking whether you should help pay for my flood insurance, the answer is yes. Much as I pay for your (or possibly your parent's) medical care, the public housing resident's rent, disaster relief for tornado victims in Kansas, and everyone's national defense. We're an interlocking, interdependent society -- everyone depends on everyone else.

     
  • Jake Buckner posted at 11:02 pm on Mon, Feb 3, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1573

    What do I think? I think maybe I should move back to Fort Worth, where the cost of living is lower, the standard of living is higher, the city is undergoing a cultural and architectural renaissance, there's no danger of public housing being built anywhere near a neighborhood I would choose, and there's no need for any type of flood insurance.

    There shouldn't be any need for it where I live now, either, because it has never flooded. At least not since there's been a seawall. But for some reason, probably the lack of appropriate technical capabilities among the mappers, my neighborhood has been labeled a high-risk flood zone. Who knew? Certainly not me, when I decided to bring my talents to G-Town.

    [cool]