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What Godzilla can teach us about emergency preparedness - The Galveston County Daily News : News

November 22, 2014

What Godzilla can teach us about emergency preparedness

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Welcome to the discussion.

4 comments:

  • carlosrponce posted at 6:42 pm on Sun, May 25, 2014.

    carlosrponce Posts: 2701

    Here's the plan. One year name the hurricanes after monsters: Hurricane Godzilla, Hurricane Frankenstein, Hurricane Dracula, Hurricane Black Lagoon Creature, Hurricane Mummy, Hurricane Mothra, Hurricane Zombie, Hurricane Werewolf, Hurricane Wolfman, Hurricane Thing, Hurricane Demon[beam]

     
  • Hank Thierry posted at 5:13 pm on Sun, May 25, 2014.

    Hank Thierry Posts: 105

    Why not have Godzilla take on MegaGodzilla, Ghidrah, Mothra, and Rodan at the same time. The bad monster is this movie reminded me of the monster that invaded Manhattan in the movie Cloverfield.

    I thought the county judge was the only person with the legal authority to call for an evacuation. I also thought that an official evacuation must go into place at a certain time. Prior to Ike, the official evacuation was issued on Wednesday, but went into effect Thursday, September 11, 2005 at 12 noon. That meant that all the supporting evacuations stores like Home Depot and Walmart had to be closed at that time. In a 48 hour scenario, it would be next to impossible to call an evacuation less than 24 hours from Godzilla, King Kong, or a major hurricane. I would like to believe that with all eyes in the sky, no major hurricane can sneak up on us. Claudette in 2003 gave us 96 hours before landfall and it never barely reached a Cat 1. The morning Claudette made landfall, waves were near the top of the seawall, Seawolf Park had winds of 62 mph, and no one did anything. It was business as usual.

     
  • gecroix posted at 12:32 pm on Sun, May 25, 2014.

    gecroix Posts: 3132

    Some areas of I45 can be used as contraflow when traffic is diverted at a few locations, or at least that's what some signs along it have said.
    As to 'stay on the main roads', it's a maybe/maybe not.
    As long as traffic is moving, it's probably best for most.
    If you know how to get where you're headed, and/or trust your GPS, then side roads can save you a lot of time, as long as we don't have a replay of idiots closing them to main route egress and ingress like in '05.
    Any major movement of people is largely a gamble, no matter how well planned, because the people actually in movement decide the final outcome by virtue of their own preparedness and actions/reactions.

     
  • Jake Buckner posted at 10:27 am on Sun, May 25, 2014.

    Jake Buckner Posts: 1714

    I enjoyed this article. Imaginative and informative. Nice job!

    "There are no contraflow lanes on the Gulf Freeway" -- Good grief! I thought this was a joke at first, but no, it's in the serious part of the article.

    There are contraflow lanes on US 290, 100 miles from the coast. Someone care more about Harris County than Galveston County?...

    Evacuation planners and TxDOT must have their reasons, but it sure seems like the most direct route away from the most serious source of danger would have contraflow...
    [whistling]