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Burger King crews uncover pricey problem for Galveston - The Galveston County Daily News : Biz Buzz / Buzz Blog

November 27, 2014

Burger King crews uncover pricey problem for Galveston

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Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2014 12:30 am

As the dirt turns: The city of Galveston is facing a whopper of a bill to keep construction of an island Burger King running smoothly.

While excavating at 5815 Broadway, crews uncovered a drainage pipe that wasn’t on the city’s utility map drawings, public works Director Angelo Grasso told the City Council at a Feb. 13 meeting. What’s more, the pipe was in ill repair.

The drainage pipe runs from Broadway south of the property all the way to Avenue K. The city determined the pipe had deteriorated and was in need of repairs. But instead of repairing the entire 800-foot-long pipe, Grasso proposed installing a new, 210-foot sewer system from the damaged drain to a working one north of Broadway. The City Council approved the emergency repairs, which could cost up to $120,000.

Developer Shoukat Dhanani, who prefers to communicate via email, said he is aiming for an opening in late March but did not elaborate about the pipe problem. He previously was shooting to open this month. Shoukat is developing a 3,600-square-foot convenience store and a 2,700-square-foot Burger King at the site. The island’s last Burger King franchise closed in 2004. Stay tuned.

Fermenting: All that activity at 8423 Stewart Road is for Galveston Island Brewing. Mark Dell’Osso is behind the brewery that will produce about a dozen classic styles of beer from around the world, such as Irish stout, Belgium ale and American pale ale, among others.

Thanks to recent changes in Texas laws, the brewery will be able to sell beer for on-premise consumption in its tap room and distribute products to local bars and restaurants.

The venture will be the first distributing brewery on the island since Falstaff Brewery closed in 1981. Before the laws changed, breweries couldn’t sell product for on-premise consumption. Instead, the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission allowed brewers to sell brewery tours or glassware to help subsidize their costs.

Dell’Osso also plans a large front yard at the site, which will be the setting for such games as Frisbee golf and bocce ball, horseshoes and more. Dell’Osso most recently was brewmaster at Beerfoot Beach Bar, 2816 Ave. R1/2. He’s aiming for a May opening. Stay tuned.

True confections: North County residents have or soon will have new eateries from which to choose.

First, Gary Walding is working toward a spring opening of Sweet Life Confectionery in the 19,000-square-foot professional center at Perkins Avenue and FM 518 in League City. The concept is a 1930s-style ice cream parlor/coffee and candy shop that will boast an antique taffy maker. He’s planning to open in the spring time, possibly around Easter.

Walding acquired the center, formerly known as Perkins Station, in October. He’s renamed it Walding Station. Sweet Life Confectionery is opening in a building that had seen four restaurants come and go.

For the first time since it was built 10 years ago, the center is fully occupied, mostly with professional service firms. Stay tuned.

Ginger snap: Buzz has had to rely on others to glean any information about the opening of Marina Cafe, 620 Marina Bay Drive in Clear Lake Shores. Chef Jim Ginger apparently is busy with the venture or just painfully publicity shy and did not return repeated phone calls.

But Ronnie Richards, president of Clear Lake Shores’ Economic Development Corp., reports the indoor-outdoor waterfront establishment offers breakfast all day, including omelets and eggs Benedict, breakfast tacos and pancakes. Marina Cafe also serves up burgers and sandwiches, including the “Reuben Burger,” made of ground sirloin, corned beef, sauerkraut and Swiss cheese and Russian aioli served on rye bread, among other fare. Salads also are available, readers report.

Reporter John Wayne Ferguson contributed to this report.